The ketogenic diet is super high in fat (about 80 percent of your daily calories), super low in carbohydrates (less than 5 percent of your calories), and moderate in protein (typically 15 to 20 percent of your calories). This is a pretty drastic departure from the generally recommended macronutrient distribution of 20 to 35 percent protein, 45 to 65 percent carbohydrates, and 10 to 35 percent fat.
It's not for me, but it interesting to learn these things, and of course there seem to be good reasons for doing it for some people. I'm happy with the œeat less, exercise more diet for now, but I might try out intermittent fasting since I've seen a few things suggesting it might help with allergies? I doubt that's well supported, but I've liked what you've had to say about it, so since it's not a thing I have to spend money on to try out, might as well, right?
[i] Hussein M Dashti, MD PhD FICS FACS, Thazhumpal C Mathew, MSc PhD FRCPath, Talib Hussein, MB ChB, Sami K Asfar, MB ChB MD FRCSEd FACS, Abdulla Behbahani, MB ChB FRCS FACSI PhD FICS FACS, Mousa A Khoursheed, MB ChB FRCS FICS, Hilal M Al-Sayer, MD PhD FICS FACS, Yousef Y Bo-Abbas, MD FRCPC, and Naji S Al-Zaid, BSc PhD. "Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients"
Some dairy products can be used in moderation, such as heavy whipping cream and most cheeses. This would depend on your individual sensitivity to dairy (some people digest it better than others) and on the particular type of food. Milk contains a relatively high amount of carbs (4 to 5 g per 100 ml) and should be limited or avoided, as well as store-bought yogurt. You can, however, have unsweetened almond milk or heavy cream. Make sure to check the labels carefully when buying dairy products, as some of them contain a rather high amount of carbs. Some people also find that eliminating dairy helps them to lose weight faster, which might be something you want to consider in case you stall.
œYour liver produces ketones all the time, but the rate depends on carbohydrate and protein intake, says Jeff Volek, Ph.D., R.D., a professor of human sciences at Ohio State University. When the majority of your diet is made up of of carbs and protein, ketogenesis slows. Replacing carbs and protein with fat will put your body into ketosis, thus ramping up ketone production. This takes about three days to induce.
I find myself in the kitchen a lot more, but that's a good thing, especially since I'm gaining more energy and endurance from the diet. Since I live alone I've also invested in more plastic bags and containers. When I use one of the recipes I divide the finished product into the number of servings, eat one and bag the rest for the freezer or fridge.
If you'd like to try intermittent fasting, it's best to start by gradually decreasing your feeding window. Start with not eating for a 12 hour stretch, including the time that you're sleeping. For example, you could stop eating at 8 in the evening, then have breakfast at 8 in the morning. Ultimately, you'll want to be mostly done with digestion by the time you go to bed, and not be hungry until late morning, so for most people a feeding window of 10am to 6pm would be a good goal.
A keto diet has shown to improve triglyceride levels and cholesterol levels most associated with arterial buildup. More specifically low-carb, high-fat diets show a dramatic increase in HDL and decrease in LDL particle concentration compared to low-fat diets.3A study in the long-term effects of a ketogenic diet shows a significant reduction in cholesterol levels, body weight, and blood glucose. Read more on keto and cholesterol >

It's not for me, but it interesting to learn these things, and of course there seem to be good reasons for doing it for some people. I'm happy with the œeat less, exercise more diet for now, but I might try out intermittent fasting since I've seen a few things suggesting it might help with allergies? I doubt that's well supported, but I've liked what you've had to say about it, so since it's not a thing I have to spend money on to try out, might as well, right?


Thank you so much for the wonderful recipes on your site. I have visited in the past and have happened upon it again. I noticed you put in the post that if anyone had questions that we could ask and so I have a big one that I need advice on if you don't mind. I have been living low carb for about 2 years now. My weight has fluctuated from 130 to about 118. I am 5'4" and female, 45 years old and mom to 5 children. My weight went up to 134 which is very uncomfortable to me because I have struggled with an eating disorder and so I really went low carb in an attempt to drop some weight. Well I have, but the problem is that I am restricting too many calories now. I have gotten down to 108 but know that 800 calories Is not enough. My question is about balance. I would not mind gaining some back but have a fear of gaining too much again. I don't want to go back there. I hiit train most days for about 25 mins. I use to do way too much. Do you have a plan that would balance my calories out so I can incorporate more Low carb options/keto and start eating normal again. I like your ideas and thought process behind all you post so I would appreciate any feed back you could give to me. Thank ML

The current hypothesis is that the brain functions differently on ketones than on glucose, and this is what causes certain brains to reduce epileptic seizures. I would then also hypothesize that certain people who feel that œbrain fog lifted on ketosis is due to either placebo effect OR their brain actually functioning differently on ketones vs glucose.

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