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In order to transition and remain in ketosis, aiming for about 30–50 net grams is typically the recommended amount of total carbs to start with. This is considered a more moderate or flexible approach but can be less overwhelming to begin with. Once you’re more accustomed to “eating keto,” you can choose to lower carbs even more if you’d like (perhaps only from time to time), down to about 20 grams of net carbs daily. This is considered the standard, “strict” amount that many keto dieters aim to adhere to for best results, but remember that everyone is a bit different.
[iv] Hussein M Dashti, MD PhD FICS FACS, Thazhumpal C Mathew, MSc PhD FRCPath, Talib Hussein, MB ChB, Sami K Asfar, MB ChB MD FRCSEd FACS, Abdulla Behbahani, MB ChB FRCS FACSI PhD FICS FACS, Mousa A Khoursheed, MB ChB FRCS FICS, Hilal M Al-Sayer, MD PhD FICS FACS, Yousef Y Bo-Abbas, MD FRCPC, and Naji S Al-Zaid, BSc PhD. "Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients"
I’m really interested in that article also. We had a baby almost a year ago. We decided to give the plant-based diet a go, and has been successful. But, I’m stuck now. Haven’t lost any more weight. And recently just learned of the keto diet! I started last week, but I’m a mess with what to eat, being plant-based and all. Can’t wait for that post! I’ve bookmarked this for future reference.
The second way is called autophagy, and it goes hand in hand with letting your body rest from digestion. Autophagy is the process that cells use to remove waste, including malfunctioning parts of cells, or even whole cells that are not functioning correctly and can’t be healed. If you have read much about cancer, this may sound like it’s connected, and it is. Regularly allowing cells to be in a state of autophagy makes them more efficient and keeps them from growing into a malignant state. It also helps them to live longer, which translates to a longer, healthier life for you.
A modified version of the ketogenic diet, which allows you to eat protein more liberally — at 20 to 30 percent of your total calories — with the same carbohydrate restriction, is the more commonly used version of the diet today. Some of the aims of the latest version of the ketogenic diet are weight loss, weight management, and improved athletic performance.
The removal of many grains and fruits with such a large emphasis on fats can bring about its own set of side effects. “If not done properly — with most of your carbohydrates coming from fiber-rich vegetables — you may not be getting enough fiber, which can lead to constipation,” says Chris Mohr, PhD, RD, a sports dietitian based in Louisville, Kentucky, and co-owner of MohrResults.com. (5)
It comes down to simple mathematics. In order to stay in ketosis, you need to eat a very very low number of carbs. And if you eat too much protein, this can actually knock you out of ketosis as well. Therefore, if you’re eating almost no carbs, and you are eating moderate amounts of protein, the ONLY remaining macronutrient you can consume to fill you up each day would be fat. Add in that consuming fat allows you to stay in ketosis, and you are consuming a high fat, medium protein, low carb diet.

I’ve always heard that the brain functions well on ketones. Gluconeogenisis typically reduces ketosis, though as well? This is the first time I’ve heard anyone say the brain can’t use anything but glucose. I know there’s *preferred* sources of fuel over others, but I was also fairly certain other sources were fine.. or humans might be in a bit of trouble.

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