The keto diet (also known as ketogenic diet, low carb diet and LCHF diet) is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet. Maintaining this diet is a great tool for weight loss. More importantly though, according to an increasing number of studies, it helps reduce risk factors for diabetes, heart diseases, stroke, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, and more1-6.On the keto diet, your body enters a metabolic state called ketosis. While in ketosis your body is using ketone bodies for energy instead of glucose. Ketone bodies are derived from fat and are a much more stable, steady source of energy than glucose, which is derived from carbohydrates.
That's why I co-wrote the "Fat for Fuel Ketogenic Cookbook" alongside renowned Australian celebrity chef Pete Evans. This book combines research-backed medical advice with delicious, kitchen-tested recipes that will help make shifting to fat-burning much easier. Whether you're just a budding cook or a master chef, there's a delicious meal waiting to be prepared that'll take your health to the next level.

The biggest challenge with vegan and vegetarian diets is getting enough protein. These diets are traditionally lower in protein anyway, since they exclude the concentrated proteins in animal flesh. These individuals may want to include plant-based protein powders and shakes. Be wary of the ingredients, since these powders may contain various sugars that aren't compatible with a ketogenic diet.


The ketogenic diet is super high in fat (about 80 percent of your daily calories), super low in carbohydrates (less than 5 percent of your calories), and moderate in protein (typically 15 to 20 percent of your calories). This is a pretty drastic departure from the generally recommended macronutrient distribution of 20 to 35 percent protein, 45 to 65 percent carbohydrates, and 10 to 35 percent fat.
Ketogenesis has existed as long as humans have. If you eat a very low amount of carbohydrates, you starve your brain of glucose, its main fuel source. Your body still needs fuel to function, so it taps into your reserve of ketones, which are compounds the liver creates from fat when blood insulin is low. This process is known as ketosis: It's like when a hybrid car runs out of gas and reverts to pure electricity.
Also make sure that you know what foods have mostly carbs, fat, and protein, so you can make the right choices. For instance, it's not just bread, pasta, chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream that contain carbs. Beans may contain protein, but they're also very high in carbohydrates. Fruit and veggies also mostly contain carbs. The only foods that don't contain carbs are meat (protein) and pure fats, like butter and oils (including olive oil and coconut oil).

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Medical Disclaimer: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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