When you eat foods high in carbohydrates and fat, your body naturally produces glucose. Carbohydrates are the easiest thing for the body to process, and therefore it will use them first – resulting in the excess fats to be stored immediately. In turn, this causes weight gain and health problems that are associated with high fat, high carbohydrate diets (NOT keto).
To be confident about being in ketosis, especially at the beginning when you're not quite sure how you should feel, it’s best to measure your ketone levels.  By monitoring your ketone levels, you can assure that you’re doing the diet correctly and make dietary adjustments based on what you measure. People also respond to diet and exercise differently, so the best way to cater the keto diet to your own biology is to measure.
I am also working to share personal success stories on my blog. If you are planning to start this keto diet, please take before pictures, progress pictures, keep a food diary, and keep track of your weight and measurements. Then when you are ready (maybe at your halfway point, or once you reach your goal weight, you can send me your results for me to share with others).
I decided to try going “keto-ish” after nearly a year of unsuccessful weight loss. Before trying Keto, I was hungry all the time and the number on the scale wasn’t budging despite meticulously sticking to my meal plan and exercising 3-5 days a week. It’s been about three weeks since I’ve started this new approach to eating and the pounds are flying off. It’s amazing. I’ve discovered riced cauliflower and zoodles, two things I never knew that I loved.
For any individual with diabetes, discussing dietary changes — especially those as dramatic as the ones the ketogenic diet requires — with your healthcare team is essential. Because carbohydrates are broken down into glucose in the blood, cutting carbohydrates from your diet could cause levels to crash rapidly depending on your current medication regimen. Such a change may require significant adjustments to medication and insulin to prevent dangerous side effects such as low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia. (8)
Hi Jordan – thank you for reaching out. We have a ton of articles on here (https://theketoqueens.com/category/blog/) that you may find helpful. We also wrote a post about starting a keto diet (https://theketoqueens.com/keto-diet/), then we have a keto course that walks you step by step to starting a keto diet (under shop), and if you need individual keto coaching I do that on my other website LaraClevenger.com. Please let us know if you can help in any way.
I have been on keto for about 3 weeks now thanks for all the info what I have lost probably fluid but my main thing is my stomach going doen slowly..I have some medical pre diabetic. BP and 2 strokes.must lose at least 70 pounds but I sincerely fo not understand the macros how do you count them I am rating only 2 meals now though loving that staying full not hungry walk about 3 days a week..more during summer…the grocery list I have down but can’t quite undetstand the macros..very happy to have people to talk to thanks glad you are available

I believe (as well as the numerous experts I have interviewed) that over 90 percent of cancer cases are either preventable or treatable. The key here is to view cancer as a metabolic dysfunction, allowing you to gain control over this dreadful disease. Simply put, the right foods and strategies may help suppress cancer growth while simultaneously pushing it into remission.


The ketogenic diet is super high in fat (about 80 percent of your daily calories), super low in carbohydrates (less than 5 percent of your calories), and moderate in protein (typically 15 to 20 percent of your calories). This is a pretty drastic departure from the generally recommended macronutrient distribution of 20 to 35 percent protein, 45 to 65 percent carbohydrates, and 10 to 35 percent fat.
Because the main tenet of the keto diet is counting and cutting carbs — a commonly used way to control blood sugar — this eating approach has become increasingly popular among people with type 2 diabetes who are looking to lower their A1C, which is the two- to three-month average measurement of blood sugar levels. Indeed, research suggests this diet may lead to fast weight loss and potentially lower blood sugar for people with the disease. (13)
You can use the Ketone Test Strips to test your ketone level. These are strips that use urine to measure excreted ketones. These are inexpensive and popular, but unfortunately highly inaccurate. They only measure the level of ketones that are excreted as waste, and not used by the body. They show that you’re producing ketones, but not necessarily using them for energy.
LCHF is a plan that is very similar to an Atkins approach, but the focus is placed on the higher ingestion of fats, and a perpetual restriction of carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day, and in some cases nearly 0 grams a day are consumed. There is no specific restriction of artificial or manufactured foods, only that the fat is kept higher, around 70%-85% of the diet.
Check the nutrition labels on all your products to see if they’re high in carbs. There are hidden carbs in the unlikeliest of places (like ketchup and canned soups). Try to avoid buying products with dozens of incomprehensible ingredients. Less is usually healthier.Always check the serving sizes against the carb counts. Manufacturers can sometimes recommend inconceivably small serving sizes to seemingly reduce calorie and carb numbers.

Quick update – been doing a keto-type diet for a couple of months now. My BP is down to the lowest it’s been in something like 10 years, though still on 1/2 dose for my meds. I’ve lost about 30 pounds in the last 4 months (give or take a bit as I’m not sure exactly where I started). I’ll admit I still use Truvia and will have a Coke Zero every now and then, but eliminating the wheat and corn breads and sugars to reduce my carb intake to < 50g/day on average has made a huge difference. (I'm sure some still sneaks in with some of the food I eat out, but for the most part it's pretty good.)

Because the main tenet of the keto diet is counting and cutting carbs — a commonly used way to control blood sugar — this eating approach has become increasingly popular among people with type 2 diabetes who are looking to lower their A1C, which is the two- to three-month average measurement of blood sugar levels. Indeed, research suggests this diet may lead to fast weight loss and potentially lower blood sugar for people with the disease. (13)
There are variations of the ketogenic diet that are implemented for a variety of reasons.  One of the top reasons these variations are used are for athletes who are not getting the necessary energy required for their intense workouts.  There are also those who enjoy the benefits of ketosis, but they just do not feel the same without a carb refeed day every now and then.
On a keto diet, weight loss can often be substantial and happen quickly (especially for those who start the diet very overweight or obese). The 2013 study published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that those following a keto diet “achieved better long-term body weight and cardiovascular risk factor management when compared with individuals assigned to a conventional low-fat diet (i.e. a restricted-energy diet with less than 30 percent of energy from fat).” (4)
Quick update – been doing a keto-type diet for a couple of months now. My BP is down to the lowest it’s been in something like 10 years, though still on 1/2 dose for my meds. I’ve lost about 30 pounds in the last 4 months (give or take a bit as I’m not sure exactly where I started). I’ll admit I still use Truvia and will have a Coke Zero every now and then, but eliminating the wheat and corn breads and sugars to reduce my carb intake to < 50g/day on average has made a huge difference. (I'm sure some still sneaks in with some of the food I eat out, but for the most part it's pretty good.)

The first tip to get back to losing weight is to boost the amount of calories you are consuming. Say you’re eating 1200 calories per day. Overtime, your body down-regulates so it just needs about 1000 calories per day to maintain basal function. Therefore, the amount of calories that used to help you lose weight is now only helping you maintain your current weight. So, by boosting your calories, you are actually boosting your metabolism and you may even notice some weight loss in the days after your caloric increase.

There are several types of the keto diet, but essentially, to achieve a state of ketosis, you have to severely reduce the amount of carbs you eat. (You can use this ketogenic calculator to create a custom food plan.) Data suggest the average American man over age 20 consumes 47.4 percent of his daily calories from carbs, and the average American woman over age 20 consumes 49.6 percent of her daily calories from carbs. (3) But in the classic ketogenic diet, which was originally used for the management of seizure disorders, 80 to 90 percent of calories come from fat, 5 to 15 percent come from protein, and 5 to 10 percent come from carbohydrates.


I’m really interested in that article also. We had a baby almost a year ago. We decided to give the plant-based diet a go, and has been successful. But, I’m stuck now. Haven’t lost any more weight. And recently just learned of the keto diet! I started last week, but I’m a mess with what to eat, being plant-based and all. Can’t wait for that post! I’ve bookmarked this for future reference.
Absolutely Steve. I love ranch salad dressing, cheese, cream cheese, steak, shrimp, and some vegetables. I am making “fakery” to satisfy my sweet tooth. (Fakery is baking using almond or coconut flour instead of wheat and white flour, and Swerve sweetener instead of sugar (made with Erythritol which has no impact on GI and is good for your teeth) I am over half way to my goal already. Thank you for your article. I appreciate your dedication, knowledge and sharing with the world. (and your cute animal gifs)

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