It’s not for me, but it interesting to learn these things, and of course there seem to be good reasons for doing it for some people. I’m happy with the “eat less, exercise more” diet for now, but I might try out intermittent fasting since I’ve seen a few things suggesting it might help with allergies? I doubt that’s well supported, but I’ve liked what you’ve had to say about it, so since it’s not a thing I have to spend money on to try out, might as well, right?
A modified version of the ketogenic diet, which allows you to eat protein more liberally — at 20 to 30 percent of your total calories — with the same carbohydrate restriction, is the more commonly used version of the diet today. Some of the aims of the latest version of the ketogenic diet are weight loss, weight management, and improved athletic performance.
I’m honestly a little skeptical about it the idea of keto permanently. My brief glance at the literature seems to imply that it can have side effects of kidney stones, skeletal fractures, and slow the growth rate of children, but that was a study on kids with epilepsy (which it treated very effectively), so who knows how that applies to adults. And the other studies I found dealt with overweight and obese subjects, so it may be hard to find something on the long term effects on otherwise healthy adults.
There are variations of the ketogenic diet that are implemented for a variety of reasons.  One of the top reasons these variations are used are for athletes who are not getting the necessary energy required for their intense workouts.  There are also those who enjoy the benefits of ketosis, but they just do not feel the same without a carb refeed day every now and then.

I find myself in the kitchen a lot more, but that's a good thing, especially since I'm gaining more energy and endurance from the diet. Since I live alone I've also invested in more plastic bags and containers. When I use one of the recipes I divide the finished product into the number of servings, eat one and bag the rest for the freezer or fridge.
Protein: Keep in mind that keto is high-fat, and not high-protein, so you don’t need to eat very much meat. Too much protein turns into glucose in the body, making it harder to stay in ketosis. Stick to fatty cuts of grass-fed, pasture-raised, or wild meat, and wild-caught fish. Red meats, offal/organ meats, pork, eggs (preferably pastured), fish, shellfish, and whey protein concentrate.
Going into nutritional ketosis by following a ketogenic diet is one of the most radical but highly beneficial lifestyle changes you can make to improve your health. As with most dietary changes, always remember to listen to your body. If you feel any side effects other than the ones listed above, then necessary adjustments to your food intake may be needed.

Net carbs are what we track when following a ketogenic diet. This calculation is pretty straightforward. Net Carbs = Total Carbs – Fiber. For example, one cup of broccoli has 6g of total carbs and 2.4g of fiber. That would mean one cup of broccoli has 3.6g of net carbs. We count Net Carbs  because dietary fiber does not have a significant metabolic effect. 


We add collagen peptides to our coffee every morning because it’s beneficial for healthy joints, skin, hair, etc. If you use collagen peptides or want to add it to your diet after talking with your health care professional, we recommend Naked Nutrition Collagen Peptides Protein Powder. This product is grass-fed and pasture-raised, and is GMO free, dairy free, soy free, gluten free, and free of growth hormones.
You are so welcome Christine! I really do believe that in order for a diet to become a lifestyle, it has to be simple otherwise people will lose interest or slip up easier. With weight loss, patience is key. Also, if you find that something is not working for you, don’t be afraid to switch it up! Every body is different so what works for one, might not work for all.
This was a great read , Steve, thanks! I’m 19 days in but forever educating myself. Wish I’d been more prepared for the keto flu cos’ that hit me HARD! Out the other side now though and hoping to see some improvements in my cycling endurance and less reliance on the gels and goos! I’ll also be doing lots of HIIT for some racing that I’ll be doing this winter (in the UK) so looking forward to experimenting with that! As a former (and maybe still current) sugar lover, the dessert tips were especially useful. Thanks again!

Wondering how many carb foods you can eat and still be “in ketosis”? The traditional ketogenic diet created for those with epilepsy consisted of getting about 75 percent of calories from sources of fat (such as oils or fattier cuts of meat), 5 percent from carbohydrates and 20 percent from protein. For most people a less strict ketogenic diet (what I call a “modified keto diet”) can still help promote weight loss in a safe, and often very fast, way.
First, let’s start with the fact that most of the food in your cabinets just won’t work anymore. They’re not keto. Period. Lock them up, throw them out, donate them to a neighbor – whatever you have to do to get them out of the house. In the first week, when you’re craving carbohydrates, these foods will be the death of your ketogenic diet. Purge your pantry of carbohydrate foods!
Here are a few of the most common side effects that I come across when people first start keto. Frequently the issues relate to dehydration or lack of micronutrients (vitamins) in the body. Make sure that you’re drinking enough water (close to a gallon a day) and eating foods with good sources of micronutrients. To read more on micronutrients, click here >
• Weight loss — If you're trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were given a low-carb ketogenic diet and a low-fat diet. After 24 weeks, researchers noted that the low-carb group lost more weight (9.4 kilograms or 20.7 pounds) compared to the low-fat group (4.8 kilograms or 10.5 pounds).1
Historically, a targeted ketogenic diet consists of limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” is the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once eaten, most people don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. In other words, total carbs – grams of fiber = net carbs. That’s the carb counts that matter most.
I find myself in the kitchen a lot more, but that's a good thing, especially since I'm gaining more energy and endurance from the diet. Since I live alone I've also invested in more plastic bags and containers. When I use one of the recipes I divide the finished product into the number of servings, eat one and bag the rest for the freezer or fridge.
A keto diet has shown to improve triglyceride levels and cholesterol levels most associated with arterial buildup. More specifically low-carb, high-fat diets show a dramatic increase in HDL and decrease in LDL particle concentration compared to low-fat diets.3A study in the long-term effects of a ketogenic diet shows a significant reduction in cholesterol levels, body weight, and blood glucose. Read more on keto and cholesterol >
On the other hand, the types of foods you’ll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb diet are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of “empty calories”).

• Weight loss — If you're trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were given a low-carb ketogenic diet and a low-fat diet. After 24 weeks, researchers noted that the low-carb group lost more weight (9.4 kilograms or 20.7 pounds) compared to the low-fat group (4.8 kilograms or 10.5 pounds).1

It truly depends from person to person. While some may be able to stay in ketosis while consuming 80 grams of carbs, others may not be so lucky. Quite a lot of people within the population can go quite high in their carbohydrate consumption and stay in ketosis, granted they have no blood sugar dysregulation. The longer you have followed the keto diet, the more your metabolism remains in ketosis after a higher carb consumption.


Because the main tenet of the keto diet is counting and cutting carbs — a commonly used way to control blood sugar — this eating approach has become increasingly popular among people with type 2 diabetes who are looking to lower their A1C, which is the two- to three-month average measurement of blood sugar levels. Indeed, research suggests this diet may lead to fast weight loss and potentially lower blood sugar for people with the disease. (13)
If you’re new to the keto diet or just still learning the ropes, your biggest questions probably revolve around figuring out just what high-fat low-carb foods you can eat on such a low-carb, ketogenic diet. Overall, remember that the bulk of calories on the keto diet are from foods that are high in natural fats along with a moderate amount of foods with protein. Those that are severely restricted are all foods that provide lots of carbs, even kinds that are normally thought of as “healthy,” like whole grains, for example.
• Cardiovascular Disease: This is definitely a point of confusion and controversy since a diet that relies so heavily on meat and fat is naturally thought to raise blood cholesterol and cause heart issues. However, some evidence suggests that this may not be the case. In fact, the keto diet may help improve triglyceride, HDL and LDL levels. A 2017 review looked at all of the available evidence around the ketogenic diet and cardiovascular health and found that the diet may be associated with some improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. Mind you, the authors also expressed their concerns with maintaining the diet in the long term, and they proposed that these benefits may not be long-lasting. It's clear that we need long-term studies to fill that gap.
After about a three weeks of writing my low carb and keto posts, I think it’s time to share a Keto Diet Plan for those of you interested in learning more about this diet.I don’t just want to share diet basics; you need to leave here with a real understanding of how keto works. That’s my job, to make this so simple anyone can do it. AlthoughI don’t want you to just know how to make keto work, I want you to understand keto inside and out!
In the first week, many people report headaches, mental fogginess, dizziness, and aggravation. Most of the time, this is the result of your electrolytes being flushed out, as ketosis has a diuretic effect. Make sure you drink plenty of water and keep your sodium intake up.6One of the fathers of keto, Dr. Phinney, shows that electrolyte levels (especially sodium) can become unbalanced with low carb intake.
Since then, it’s the same 10-15 pounds that I keep losing and gaining back. Love your mantras- I’ve written a few down in my journal and some just ring in my head like a music track- never two in a row!! Can’t outrun your fork!! The one about losing weight, looking good in the mirror, then world domination is my favorite. With keto, it gets me fantastic and very quick results and I go with a recarb meal (not recarb day) once a week. Eat a little more carbs after workouts. Now with the strips, I can see if what I’m doing post-workout keeps me in keto. I wish this article had come out a couple of months ago- I did hours of research before going keto, much of it bland, definitely no animal gifs. Thanks for all your resources- they are so eye-opening and so motivating (and funny)!! Great knowing that if I feel like I need the boost with 1-1 coaching it is available. Keep up the outstanding work!

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