The ketogenic, or "keto," diet — which first became popular in the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy and diabetes— limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day, which is the rough equivalent of a plain bagel or a cup of white rice. By comparison, dietary guidelines from the US Department of Agriculture recommend from 225 to 325 grams of carbs a day.
Starting off with it, but with the ~ 50g carbs/day. I’ve been using MyFitnessPal to track, using some advice from ketovale and others to set the targets in the service to help. Only been doing it for ~ 10 days, but down about 8 pounds so far. My biggest problem – need more veggies in my diet and that’s a bit tougher. Working on that with salads and such. I also need to purge out the older salad dressings made w/ vegetable oils and such, but getting there. So – not fully into Keto, but working towards that. I’ve definitely found that I can eat quite a few foods I actually like so that’s not a huge downside. Do I miss pizza/pasta/tortillas? Sometimes. But there are keto pizza crusts (of a sort) and spaghetti squash works really well for me to replace pasta. I have yet to try a “zucchini” wrapped enchilada, but I think that might work as well.

• Cyclic ketogenic diet (CKD) — Whereas TKD is focused on fitness enthusiasts, CKD is focused more on athletes and bodybuilders. In CKD, you cycle between a normal ketogenic diet, and a short period of high carb consumption or "re-feeds."8 The idea here is to take advantage of the carbohydrates to replenish the glycogen lost from your muscles during athletic activity or working out.9


This means that if you have risk factors for heart disease — such as elevated cholesterol levels, high blood pressure (hypertension), or a strong family history of the disease — you should use caution when following this diet. The diet's heavy reliance on fat, especially saturated fat, can elevate cholesterol levels, further increasing your chances of developing heart disease in the future. (7)
#3: Next, calculate your protein requirements. If you are active, Target 0.8-1.2 g of protein per pound of weight. This is a simplified version of a complex calculation you can do, which is dependent on your lean body mass, how active you are, etc. If you have a lot of weight to lose, you’ll wan to adjust this number down to more like 0.5-.6g per pound (consult the above calculator) You can multiply this by 4 to see how many calories total that would be.

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