The Atkins diet, on the other hand, is solely focused on weight loss. There is no restriction on artificial sweeteners or manufactured foods, as long as the foods consumed fit the Atkins prescribed ratios. There are four phases to the Atkins diet. The first phase is the most strict, designed to get you into ketosis. The second phase is a tolerance testing phase, where you add more foods to see how many grams of carbohydrate you can still eat and lose weight. The third phase is more generous with carbs, and the fourth phase is the most generous, and it’s in either the third or fourth phase that most people find a good maintenance level.
LYTEshow is perfect for the person who can never seem to get enough water or their daily 8 cups. When you add this electrolyte super liquid to 1 glass of water, it becomes equivalent to drinking 3 glasses of water – pretty incredible! It also tastes great & has a mineral base naturally sourced in the USA and clinically tested to be a significantly more efficient form of hydration than water alone.
• Standard ketogenic diet (SKD) — SKD is the type I typically recommend for most people, because it is very effective. It focuses on high consumption of healthy fats: As I explain in my book, "Fat for Fuel," you should aim for having 70 to 85 percent of your total daily calories to come from healthy fats. For your protein intake, the general rule of thumb is to follow the formula of 1 gram of protein for every kilogram of your lean body mass.

Each of the above methods is good for its own reason; however, we would suggest only one: the blood test.  The urine strips are cheap, yet not accurate.  The breath analyzer is expensive, difficult to find and has definite quirks.  The blood tests, while somewhat expensive, are fully reliable and testing your blood - the most accurate place to measure your ketones.
The Atkins diet, on the other hand, is solely focused on weight loss. There is no restriction on artificial sweeteners or manufactured foods, as long as the foods consumed fit the Atkins prescribed ratios. There are four phases to the Atkins diet. The first phase is the most strict, designed to get you into ketosis. The second phase is a tolerance testing phase, where you add more foods to see how many grams of carbohydrate you can still eat and lose weight. The third phase is more generous with carbs, and the fourth phase is the most generous, and it’s in either the third or fourth phase that most people find a good maintenance level.
The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key, underlying causes of weight gain — including hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels, and the cycle of restricting and “binging” on empty calories due to hunger that so many dieters struggle with. Yet that’s not a problem with what’s on the keto diet food list.

• Weight loss — If you're trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were given a low-carb ketogenic diet and a low-fat diet. After 24 weeks, researchers noted that the low-carb group lost more weight (9.4 kilograms or 20.7 pounds) compared to the low-fat group (4.8 kilograms or 10.5 pounds).1
Ketogenic diets, like most low carb diets, work through the elimination of glucose. Because most folks live on a high carb diet, our bodies normally run on glucose (or sugar) for energy. We cannot make glucose and only have about 24 hours’ worth stored in our muscle tissue and liver. Once glucose is no longer available from food sources, we begin to burn stored fat instead, or fat from our diets.
That said, I think the biggest changes are the result of me dropping the sugars and breads. Tracking my eating and being more conscious about my foods has made a difference. I definitely plan to keep on this track for a while and slowly work towards a fuller keto-adapted diet/body. I’m not going with the “all-in” that some recommend, cutting out all artificial sweeteners and such, though I have limited them. I’m not really tempted to indulge in the sweets that have been tempting in the past.
Quick update – been doing a keto-type diet for a couple of months now. My BP is down to the lowest it’s been in something like 10 years, though still on 1/2 dose for my meds. I’ve lost about 30 pounds in the last 4 months (give or take a bit as I’m not sure exactly where I started). I’ll admit I still use Truvia and will have a Coke Zero every now and then, but eliminating the wheat and corn breads and sugars to reduce my carb intake to < 50g/day on average has made a huge difference. (I'm sure some still sneaks in with some of the food I eat out, but for the most part it's pretty good.)

And good news for coffee addicts: you can still have your morning cup of joe. You’ll just need to adjust what you stir into it. Switch out flavored creamer for the real deal—full-fat heavy whipping cream, which has only 1 gram of carbs per tablespoon. If you want to give your java a jolt of sweet, stir in a low-carb sweetener that uses sugar alcohols. But if you can skip the sweet, even better. In time, you’ll retrain your palate to not crave a sugary start to the day.
Cyclical ketogenic diet: The Bulletproof Diet falls into this category. You eat high fat, low carb (less than 50 grams of net carbs a day) five to six days of the week. On day seven, you up your carb intake to roughly 150 grams, during what’s called a carb refeed day. Carb cycling this way helps you avoid the negative effects some people experience when they restrict carbs long term, like thyroid issues, fatigue and dry eyes.[10] [11] Full ketosis isn’t for everyone, and adding carbs such as sweet potatoes, squash, and white rice one day a week keeps your body systems that need some amount of carbs functioning properly.

I like it – and I’m surprised I like it. I’m only down 5 lbs. after a month but I’m down 3 inches on my waist and 2 inches on my hips. I do feel better physically and I love not being hungry! I used to be that person who could eat pasta like a lumberjack – now I often don’t even finish my food. I have had a hard time sticking to 20 net carbs, I usually end up in the high 20’s somewhere, but I’m in ketosis according to the testing strips. It’s much harder to stick to 20 net as a vegetarian. Everything you eat has some level of carbs and they do add up. But overall, this is the only thing I’ve lost any weight or inches on in about 7 or 8 years. Starvation used to work until I hit 45 and then, forget it, I could eat 700 calories a day and not lose a pound. I’m so excited *something* is actually working.
Ketosis is the result of following the standard ketogenic diet, which is why it’s also sometimes called “the ketosis diet.” Ketosis takes place when glucose from carbohydrate foods (like grains, all sources of sugar or fruit, for example) is drastically reduced, which forces the body to find an alternative fuel source: fat. Ketosis can also be achieved by multiple days of total fasting, but that isn’t sustainable beyond a few days. (It’s why some keto diet plans combine intermittent fasting or IMF with the keto diet for greater weight loss effects.)
Therefore, when you’re following a ketogenic diet, your body is burning fat for energy rather than carbohydrates, so in the process most people lose weight and excess body fat rapidly, even when consuming lots of fat and adequate calories through their diet. Another major benefit of the keto diet is that there’s no need to count calories, feel hungry or attempt to burn loads of calories through hours of intense exercise.
The biggest draw for me is how many of those who’ve tried it say they don’t get hungry. The possibility of that blows my mind, as someone who’s used to any sort of calorie restriction meaning hours of feeling hungry every day. It’s tantalizing enough that I at least want to try. And what have I got to lose, right? I’m already morbidly obese; it’s hard to imagine screwing this up so bad it makes that worse.

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