[i] Hussein M Dashti, MD PhD FICS FACS, Thazhumpal C Mathew, MSc PhD FRCPath, Talib Hussein, MB ChB, Sami K Asfar, MB ChB MD FRCSEd FACS, Abdulla Behbahani, MB ChB FRCS FACSI PhD FICS FACS, Mousa A Khoursheed, MB ChB FRCS FICS, Hilal M Al-Sayer, MD PhD FICS FACS, Yousef Y Bo-Abbas, MD FRCPC, and Naji S Al-Zaid, BSc PhD. "Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients"
The keto diet (also known as ketogenic diet, low carb diet and LCHF diet) is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet. Maintaining this diet is a great tool for weight loss. More importantly though, according to an increasing number of studies, it helps reduce risk factors for diabetes, heart diseases, stroke, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and more1-6.On the keto diet, your body enters a metabolic state called ketosis. While in ketosis your body is using ketone bodies for energy instead of glucose. Ketone bodies are derived from fat and are a much more stable, steady source of energy than glucose, which is derived from carbohydrates.
From the early understanding of the keto research and literature, it looks like we're just scratching the surface understanding some of the potential therapeutic roles of the keto diet. While it's unclear if it's any better or worse than any other diet for weight loss, the reality is that there is no one-size-fits-all model for diets. This doesn't even consider that weight-loss diets, in general, don't really work. While researchers can't agree on a specific statistic, it's commonly accepted that the vast majority of dieters will regain the weight lost (and often pack on extra pounds, as well). The long-term outcome of the keto diet is likely to be no different, especially given how challenging and restrictive it is to maintain.
Aside from carb flu, be warned that staying in long-term, continuous ketosis may have drawbacks that may actually undermine your health and longevity. To stay on the safe side, I recommend undergoing a cyclic ketogenic diet. The "metabolic magic" that ketosis brings to the mitochondria actually occurs during the refeeding phase, not during the starvation phase.

KetoVale‘s Tip:  Exogenous ketones are NOT a magic pill or a carb blocker. You should be making better choices about your diet meal plan first and then ask yourself if you want to or how you can supplement afterward to help out. Remember it’s a supplement and not supposed to be used as an eraser to erase eating choices (by definition, supplement is a thing added to something else in order to complete or enhance it). It’s like building muscles, you can take supplements, but if you don’t workout and eat right, the muscles won’t show up. The supplements aren’t going to lift those heavy weights for you. There’s no magic bullet.
• Water Loss: There is some evidence that higher-protein diets like the keto diet do have some weight-loss benefits, partially because both fat and protein are satiating so you don't feel hungry, but also because of the loss in glycogen stores. Glycogen is the body's glucose storage that is bound up with water, so when we deplete the glycogen, you also deplete your water storage. Lose a ton of water, and you're going to drop weight fast.
At the core of the classic ketogenic diet is severely restricting intake of all or most foods with sugar and starch (carbohydrates). These foods are broken down into sugar (insulin and glucose) in our blood once we eat them, and if these levels become too high, extra calories are much more easily stored as body fat and results in unwanted weight gain. However, when glucose levels are cut off due to low-carb dieting, the body starts to burn fat instead and produces ketones that can be measured in the blood (using urine strips, for example).
It’s not for me, but it interesting to learn these things, and of course there seem to be good reasons for doing it for some people. I’m happy with the “eat less, exercise more” diet for now, but I might try out intermittent fasting since I’ve seen a few things suggesting it might help with allergies? I doubt that’s well supported, but I’ve liked what you’ve had to say about it, so since it’s not a thing I have to spend money on to try out, might as well, right?

The ketogenic diet is based on the principle that by depleting the body of carbohydrates, which are its primary source of energy, you can force the body to burn fat for fuel, thereby maximizing weight loss. When you consume foods that contain carbohydrates, the body converts those carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar, which it then uses for energy. (1)

• Athletic Performance Impediments: For those people who train heavy and hard, going keto might cramp your style. As important as protein is for muscle growth, carbs also play an equally critical role by releasing insulin to drive that protein into muscles faster. It also helps us build up glycogen stores for longer training sessions, runs or hikes. One comprehensive review of the literature in sports nutrition found that while research is lacking on the long-term impacts of the keto diet, in the short term, the keto diet is inferior to other diet protocols on anaerobic, aerobic and in some cases even strength performance measures.

It’s not for me, but it interesting to learn these things, and of course there seem to be good reasons for doing it for some people. I’m happy with the “eat less, exercise more” diet for now, but I might try out intermittent fasting since I’ve seen a few things suggesting it might help with allergies? I doubt that’s well supported, but I’ve liked what you’ve had to say about it, so since it’s not a thing I have to spend money on to try out, might as well, right?
It’s easy to get caught up on the “low-carb” part of the diet and not give enough attention to the “high-fat” part. Fat is what makes you full, gives you energy (when in ketosis), and makes food taste delicious. For most people this figure should be north of 70 percent of daily calories. Keep carbs under 20g, hit your protein goal, and eat fat until you’re full.
Also make sure that you know what foods have mostly carbs, fat, and protein, so you can make the right choices. For instance, it’s not just bread, pasta, chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream that contain carbs. Beans may contain protein, but they’re also very high in carbohydrates. Fruit and veggies also mostly contain carbs. The only foods that don’t contain carbs are meat (protein) and pure fats, like butter and oils (including olive oil and coconut oil).

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Medical Disclaimer: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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