The current hypothesis is that the brain functions differently on ketones than on glucose, and this is what causes certain brains to reduce epileptic seizures. I would then also hypothesize that certain people who feel that “brain fog” lifted on ketosis is due to either placebo effect OR their brain actually functioning differently on ketones vs glucose.
The classic ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet plan that was originally designed in the 1920s for patients with epilepsy by researchers working at Johns Hopkins Medical Center. (1) Researchers found that fasting — avoiding consumption of all foods for a brief period of time (such as with intermittent fasting), including those that provide carbohydrates — helped reduce the amount of seizures patients suffered, in addition to having other positive effects on body fat, blood sugar, cholesterol and hunger levels. (2)
Is it recommended to calculate our macros using the method suggested in the article to calculate yourself or by using the linked calculator? I get two different sets of numbers and am not sure which might be the better version. The main difference is amount of caloris and amount of protein to consume. The calculator gives me about 300 less calories, about the same amount of fat and carbs, but about 40 less protein than when I calculate myself.
It’s not for me, but it interesting to learn these things, and of course there seem to be good reasons for doing it for some people. I’m happy with the “eat less, exercise more” diet for now, but I might try out intermittent fasting since I’ve seen a few things suggesting it might help with allergies? I doubt that’s well supported, but I’ve liked what you’ve had to say about it, so since it’s not a thing I have to spend money on to try out, might as well, right?
When you cut back on carbs or just haven't eaten in a while, your body looks for other sources of energy to fill the void. Fat is typically that source. When your blood sugar drops because you're not feeding your body carbs, fat is released from your cells and flood the liver. The liver turns the fat into ketone bodies, which your body uses as its second choice for energy.
Is it recommended to calculate our macros using the method suggested in the article to calculate yourself or by using the linked calculator? I get two different sets of numbers and am not sure which might be the better version. The main difference is amount of caloris and amount of protein to consume. The calculator gives me about 300 less calories, about the same amount of fat and carbs, but about 40 less protein than when I calculate myself.
Some people just cut out the bulk of carbohydrates from major sources like breads, pastas, and sodas, and these people are on a Low Carbohydrate plan. There isn’t anything particularly strict about it, it’s more about being mindful of overall carb intake, often without tracking. This can be a good place to test the waters of a keto diet, though many people on this kind of plan never get into ketosis without further restriction.
Some people like to weigh their food when they first transition from a normal diet to a ketogenic diet, in order to have a fuller understanding of the amount of carbohydrates that they consume, although this can be used just in the beginning as a guide. But ultimately no, you do not have to weigh your food in order to be successful with a keto diet.
• Cardiovascular Disease: This is definitely a point of confusion and controversy since a diet that relies so heavily on meat and fat is naturally thought to raise blood cholesterol and cause heart issues. However, some evidence suggests that this may not be the case. In fact, the keto diet may help improve triglyceride, HDL and LDL levels. A 2017 review looked at all of the available evidence around the ketogenic diet and cardiovascular health and found that the diet may be associated with some improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. Mind you, the authors also expressed their concerns with maintaining the diet in the long term, and they proposed that these benefits may not be long-lasting. It's clear that we need long-term studies to fill that gap.
If you talk to keto aficionados, you’ll find many save leftovers from dinner for the next day’s lunch. Cook once, eat twice—your keto diet menu for lunch is solved. If you don’t like leftovers or if you’re craving something different for lunch, the mid-day meal can be as simple as a scoop of chicken salad. Or, hit the salad bar at a local grocery store and top a bowl of greens with some good-fat goodies. You can also try one of these simple keto lunches:
I will admit to appeal to authority here. This was said by the professor of the course I mentioned in my previous post, but it was also confirmed by many of my classmates, whom, at this point(for reasons, which are too tedious and long winded to extrapolate on atm), I consider smart enough to know their business, that I choose to believe them. All of them. If nothing else, the professor himself is,well… authority on his field.

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