Those issues can be part of what's known as the “keto flu,” Warren says. Other side effects of the keto diet, all of which are tied to carb withdrawal, can include lightheadedness, nausea, mental fog, cramps, and headaches, in addition to tiredness. Luckily, the keto flu doesn't usually last more than a week—which is coincidentally about when people start to see the number on the scale go down, says Warren.
Symptoms of the keto flu include headache, fatigue, dizziness, sleep problems, heart palpitations, cramps, and diarrhea. These side effects usually lessen and eventually resolve in about two weeks. (2) But to lessen the effects of any discomfort, simply consider slowly transitioning onto a ketogenic diet rather than rushing to change your eating habits. By slowly lowering your carbohydrate intake, while gradually increasing your intake of dietary fat over time, you can transition with less of a negative impact and potentially prevent the keto flu.
There are reasons a strange diet like this has stuck around since the 1920's.  A diet like keto that is low in sugar lowers blood glucose and insulin levels has several positive effects on the body, especially in overweight or obese people. The ketogenic diet gives your body the chance to re-adjust its glucose and insulin levels.  In addition, there are health benefits that will enhance daily life, as well as help treat disease.  Check out these benefits of the ketogenic diet:
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Totally agree that it’s not something for everyone, though. Even one of the authors I read said he sometimes sneaks a french fry or a bite of cheesecake/ice cream, though he’s able to stop after just a little bit and it doesn’t throw him off horribly. Of course, that’s not license to eat junk all the time, but it does mean that once you’re well-adapted, you can sometimes indulge.
But what does the science say? Results are mixed. In one Spanish study of 20 obese adults, participants were put on a low-calorie keto diet and lost an average of 40 pounds over four months. Another small experiment had a similar outcome. In a six-month Experimental & Clinical Cardiology study of 83 obese adults, those on the keto diet lost an average of 33 pounds, while lowering their bad (LDL) cholesterol levels and increasing their good (HDL) cholesterol.
Unfortunately, long-term fasting is not a feasible option for more than a few days, therefore the ketogenic diet was developed to mimic the same beneficial effects of fasting. Essentially the keto diet works by “tricking” the body into thinking it is fasting, through a strict elimination of glucose that is found in carbohydrate foods. Today the standard ketogenic diet goes by several different names, including the “no-carb diet” or “very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet”(LCKD or VLCKD for short).
• Potassium: With the approved list of foods being so brief, you might not be getting in enough fruits and veggies on keto. One of the biggest impacts? A potassium deficiency—and all of the lovely constipation and muscle cramps that accompanies it. Aim to up your intake of foods like spinach, avocado, tomatoes, kale and mushrooms to get your potassium fix.
Thanks for reaching out. I don't currently have any meal plans, but I am working on some and hope to have them up soon. I completely understand your fear, but on Keto, we don't count calories. That's not to say you want to start eating 5000 calories a day, but if you remember to keep your macros balanced with both fat and protein you won't even have to worry about counting calories. I don't ever look at calories and honestly have no idea how many calories I eat on any given day. I know when I first started my calories were pretty low but after I had got the hang of it, they went up to like 1500 a day. After about two months I didn't watch my calories at all. The number I pay the most attention to is fat. I have to get plenty of fat, or I will stall, and I don't feel as good. I will be sure to email you when I have my plans up so you can take a look at them.
Hi Kristin, My meals and times vary! I usually skip breakfast because Im not hungry in the mornings anymore. Ill have a protein shake before lunch then my meals consist of proteins, fats like avocado and some veggies cooked in ghee. I still do indulge in diet soda but definitely pay attention to see how your body reacts to it! Everyone is different and reacts differently to some ingredients. Definitely figure out your macros and go from there 🙂
The keto diet changes the way your body converts food into energy. Eating a lot of fat and very few carbs puts you in ketosis, a metabolic state where your body burns fat instead of carbs for fuel. When your body is unable to get glucose from carbs, your liver converts fatty acids from your diet into ketones, an alternative source of energy. Burning ketones in place of glucose reduces inflammation and spurs weight loss.[1] 

Because the main tenet of the keto diet is counting and cutting carbs — a commonly used way to control blood sugar — this eating approach has become increasingly popular among people with type 2 diabetes who are looking to lower their A1C, which is the two- to three-month average measurement of blood sugar levels. Indeed, research suggests this diet may lead to fast weight loss and potentially lower blood sugar for people with the disease. (13)


Aude, Y., A. S, Agatston, F. Lopez-Jimenez, et al. “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat: A Randomized Trial.” JAMA Internal Medicine 164, no. 19 (2004): 2141–46. doi: 10.1001/archinte.164.19.2141. jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/217514.
The ketogenic diet — a high-fat and very low-carb eating plan — can be tough to start. After all, it’s likely a radical departure from the way you’re eating now (a typical standard American diet is high in carbohydrates and processed foods). But many people are trying the keto diet, which puts your body in a state of ketosis. That's what happens when your body’s carb-burning switch flips to a fat-burning one, a change that can cause weight loss and has even been credited with controlling diabetes. (1)

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