Okay, I’ll admit I bailed just after the sriracha covered chicken costume, so maybe I missed it, but I wanted to ask: is Keto intended to be a permanent diet change? It seems very challenging, and as I was reading, I kept asking myself “How is this consistent with the concept of small sustainable changes?” Is it? I think it’s a great topic to cover, but how would you describe the relationship between the keto diet and NF philosophy regarding sustainability? Thanks!
Something that makes the keto diet different from other low-carb diets is that it does not “protein-load.” Protein is not as big a part of the diet as fat is. Reason being: In small amounts, the body can change protein to glucose, which means if you eat too much of it, especially while in the beginning stages of the keto diet, it will slow down your body’s transition into ketosis.
The information in the first section was great, but the recipes were not as helpful as I had hoped. The ingredients are very expensive - I spent $130 shopping for just the first three days of meals and that didn't include the leg of lamb, which I skipped. Also, as a working mom, I would consider the amount of kitchen time as extreme. As an example, Day One includes a one-hour baking project for breakfast, followed by deviled eggs with bacon and avocado as a mid-morning snack, followed by a cooked chicken lunch, then a smoothie mid-afternoon snack, and a leg of lamb dinner with a side. Again, that's just the first day. Section 1 was great and I learned a great deal about keto lifestyle and issues. I would love the author to revise the meal plan and recipe sections to limit each day to no more than 90 minutes in the kitchen including prepping foods like boiling eggs, frying bacon, or cooking chicken which aren't currently included in her recipes times.
When you’re first getting started, it can be helpful to use a blood or breath ketone meter.  What these meters do is measure the amount of ketones (the energy source your body is switching to) in your blood or your breath.  Knowing those amounts and seeing how they increase or decrease depending on what you’re eating daily can often be a motivating and helpful indicator of the transition occurring in your body.
Also make sure that you know what foods have mostly carbs, fat, and protein, so you can make the right choices. For instance, it’s not just bread, pasta, chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream that contain carbs. Beans may contain protein, but they’re also very high in carbohydrates. Fruit and veggies also mostly contain carbs. The only foods that don’t contain carbs are meat (protein) and pure fats, like butter and oils (including olive oil and coconut oil).

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