This book is split into 3 parts: The Ketogenic Lifestyle, The 14-day Meal Plan, and the recipes. Before this book, I really didn't fully understand what a Ketogenic Diet was. Chapter 1 defines it for me in 4 words, Low-Carb, High-Fat. This diet promotes fresh whole foods and healthy fats & oils, and cuts out processed, chemically treated foods. It also tells you that when you start a Keto Diet, you'll most likely experience the Keto-Flu!

In my book "Fat for Fuel," I sought to educate readers about the benefits of using healthy fats as a catalyst to bring about improved mitochondrial function, thus allowing you to achieve better health. In essence, the book answers WHY it is important for you to consume healthy fats. However, you still need to know HOW to prepare the right ketogenic foods in an appetizing way.

But what does the science say? Results are mixed. In one Spanish study of 20 obese adults, participants were put on a low-calorie keto diet and lost an average of 40 pounds over four months. Another small experiment had a similar outcome. In a six-month Experimental & Clinical Cardiology study of 83 obese adults, those on the keto diet lost an average of 33 pounds, while lowering their bad (LDL) cholesterol levels and increasing their good (HDL) cholesterol.


A lot of changes are happening in your body and you're going to feel it! The first five to seven days can be pretty rough, but your body is getting over its dependency on sugar. During this time of transition it is essential that you supplement electrolytes. Your body is flushing out lots of water, and with that goes electrolytes. The Keto Flu can be greatly reduced if you add sodium, potassium and magnesium to your diet. Check out our supplements page for a list of electrolyte supplements we recommend. Stay on course and you'll start feeling better in no time!
The Ketogenic Diet is unlike any other diet in the world in that it utilizes a high fat, minimal carbohydrate and moderate protein system in order to reset your body's ability to burn unwanted, stored fat. By restricting carbohydrates that are converted into glucose, you begin the journey to re-program your metabolism to start burning stored fats for fuel and energy instead of first burning beneficial glycogen that is stored in your muscles.
A: It's generally recommended that only 5 percent of your daily diet is allocated to carbohydrates because if you consume more than that, your body gets thrown off ketosis. However, this is only for SKD, or the standard ketogenic diet. If you're an athlete or a bodybuilder, you can consume more carbs without affecting ketosis by following a targeted ketogenic diet (TKD) or a cyclic ketogenic diet (CKD).
When you're first getting started, it can be helpful to use a blood or breath ketone meter. What these meters do is measure the amount of ketones (the energy source your body is switching to) in your blood or your breath. Knowing those amounts and seeing how they increase or decrease depending on what you're eating daily can often be a motivating and helpful indicator of the transition occurring in your body.
From the early understanding of the keto research and literature, it looks like we're just scratching the surface understanding some of the potential therapeutic roles of the keto diet. While it's unclear if it's any better or worse than any other diet for weight loss, the reality is that there is no one-size-fits-all model for diets. This doesn't even consider that weight-loss diets, in general, don't really work. While researchers can't agree on a specific statistic, it's commonly accepted that the vast majority of dieters will regain the weight lost (and often pack on extra pounds, as well). The long-term outcome of the keto diet is likely to be no different, especially given how challenging and restrictive it is to maintain.

¢ Multiple Sclerosis: In a small 2016 study, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were put on a ketogenic diet. After six months, they reported improved quality of life, as well as physical and mental health improvements. Before doctors or researchers can make a connection between keto and MS, they need bigger sample sizes and more thorough research. Still, the preliminary findings are exciting.
Your glycogen stores can still be refilled while on a ketogenic diet. A keto diet is an excellent way to build muscle, but protein intake is crucial here. It's suggested that if you are looking to gain mass, you should be taking in about 1.0 “ 1.2g protein per lean pound of body mass. Putting muscle on may be slower on a ketogenic diet, but that's because your total body fat is not increasing as much.5Note that in the beginning of a ketogenic diet, both endurance athletes and obese individuals see a physical performance for the first week of transition.
Also make sure that you know what foods have mostly carbs, fat, and protein, so you can make the right choices. For instance, it's not just bread, pasta, chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream that contain carbs. Beans may contain protein, but they're also very high in carbohydrates. Fruit and veggies also mostly contain carbs. The only foods that don't contain carbs are meat (protein) and pure fats, like butter and oils (including olive oil and coconut oil).

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Medical Disclaimer: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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